Booked for the holidays

Join me today on Facebook at for some holiday chat and a chance to win a copy of Murder is Uncooperative. A host of cozy authors will be joining Booked for the Holidays throughout December!


Heading to Bouchercon

It’s so exciting to see writer friends from other countries arriving in Toronto for Bouchercon. While my jet lag will be nothing compared to theirs, I’m off today. Looking forward to seeing everyone. #Bouchercon2017  @SINCnational @SINCCanadaWest @crimewriterscan


WORD Vancouver

I’ll be at the WORD Vancouver festival (@WORD_Vancouver) on Sunday as part of the Crime Writers of Canada () presence. If you’re in Vancouver, stop by to visit us, listen to the panel of local mystery writers at 4 pm, or bid on our package of books in the Silent Auction. Here’s the info:

#mystery #crimefiction


Housing-inspired murder

Today I’m guest blogging on Anne Louise Bannon’s site, talking what co-operative housing is and how it figures in Murder is Uncooperative. There are housing co-ops around the world.


Housing co-ops and the civil rights movement

I’ve seen what a difference an affordable home can make in people’s lives. But I had no idea about the role co‑op housing played in the civil rights movement in North America. #housing #BlackHistoryMonth

Thanks to CHF Canada for sharing this information for Black History month and to David J. Thompson and the National Association of Housing Co-ops for documenting these important stories (follow the links below to link to newsletters containing the full versions.)

In Murder is Uncooperative, all Rebecca wants is a safe, affordable home. Many people struggle to find affordable housing. For some, available options were even fewer because of their colour. Co-operatives provided a solution.

  • In 1958, famed entertainer and civil rights activist Harry Belafonte and his young family found it difficult to find an apartmentin New York City and he ended up sending his (white) publicist to the rental broker to collect a lease agreement for an apartment. A year later, Belafonte led a consortium that bought the apartment building and then offered co‑op shares to the tenants, creating a desegregated housing co‑op.
  • Thurgood Marshall, the first African American Supreme Court Justice and the lawyer who won the historic “Brown vs The Board of Education” case that opened the doors to desegregation, was exposed to co‑ops early in his career. In 1958, Marshall and his family moved out of the Edgecombe Apartments (which would later become co‑op apartments) and into the Morningside Heights Housing Co‑op in the upper east side of Manhattan. His focus in co‑operative organizing was to develop interracial co‑operatives, and he fought for a fair regulatory environment, taking the Federal Housing Authority to task for their discriminatory ‘redlining’ practices.
  • Bayard Rustin’s co-op apartmentin New York City, in the South Penn Housing Co‑operative, became the initial hub for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom – the 1963 protest featuring by the Rev. Martin L King Jr’s “I Have a Dream” speech.



Check it out!

Happy to report that the Burnaby Public Library has copies of Murder is Uncooperative in stock. Vancouver Public Library has it on order.


Busy weekend

I’m looking forward to the Britannia Christmas Craft fair this weekend.
Murder is Uncooperative is set in the Commercial Drive area and Britannia is mentioned several times, so I’m pleased to be selling and signing books as part of this event. Admission is $2.00 at the door, free for children under 12. This is a fundraiser for inner-city after school programs.
Two days only: Friday 3pm-8pm, Saturday 10am-5pm, at Britannia Community Services Centre Gym D (1661 Napier Street, Vancouver
Food concession, Santa photo booth by donation, local handmade art, local entertainment.
Then I’ve been invited to the annual meeting of the Co-operative Housing Federation of BC on Sunday. The first 25 delegates will receive a free copy of Murder is Uncooperative!